2009 Suzuki Boulevard C50 Cruiser For Sale

Langley, BC

$2,998

Quick Look

Year Built
2009
Make
Suzuki
Model
Boulevard C50
Category
Cruiser
Color(s)
Black
Miles
67,000

Specifications

Stock#
100218
Condition
Used

Details / Description

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MANAGER CLEAROUT! GRAB SPECIAL PRICES ON SELECT YEAR-END DEALS IN STOCK TODAY. Tons invested in upgrades! NOW is the Best time to Buy an inspected pre-owned machine from International Motorsports - Come See Why We Are #1 in - Sales - Parts - Service - We are a Certified Repair and Performance Centre - Easy Financing - Instant Approvals - Low Interest Rates & Payments - We Accept trades!

The riding positions fit all our testers too and the C50's floorboards give additional flexibility. The C50's bar is a bit wider but the windshield eliminates wind pressure. There's more wind pressure on the M50 despite its lower narrower bar. Both bars offered a natural comfortable riding position for all our testers.
Suzuki invented 800cc cruiser V-twins in the early 1990s when it bumped its Intruder 750 to 805cc. And Suzuki has maintained a staunch commitment to this V-twin displacement category. While other manufacturers have dropped in and out of the class that has recently become the fastest-selling niche in motorcycling or simply left tired models to stagnate Suzuki has consistently expanded and updated its 800cc offerings. In 1997 it added the Marauder 800 and a few years later the Volusia joined the lineup.
For '05 Suzuki has relaunched its cruisers under the Boulevard banner. Its existing 800s were given facelifts as well as new designations with the displacement in cubic inches and a letter specifying style. The slim chopperish Intruder-style 800s thus become the S50. The classically styled Volusia morphs into the C50 and the all-new M50 replaces the Marauder. There is also a new fourth model the C50T which adds touring accoutrements to the C50. The labels are a bit lame; the motorcycles are anything but.
The Volusia has been our favorite 800 the last two times we compared 800s so we were curious about how the two new models the M50 and C50T--both of which are based on it--work. Although the two motorcycles look quite different from each other they share many components including a single-shock frame and drivetrain. They also have the same 4.1-gallon fuel tank same-size wheels and tires and staggered exhaust systems with dual slash-cut mufflers.

There are minor differences in the engine. The newer M50 has slightly different rocker-arm shafts which necessitate different breather covers which in turn require small cylinder-head changes. It also uses split crankshaft bearings that slightly change the crankcase which is painted black. The two bikes have different airboxes and the M50 has a smaller radiator that nonetheless cools a bit better because of additional finning on the core. The airboxes are a cosmetic touch we are surprised more manufacturers haven't used to distinguish different models using the same engine.
Unlike larger cruisers the 800 class is fairly price-sensitive so manufacturers tend to be a bit stingy about including features and technology. That makes it somewhat surprising that Suzuki included fuel injection on all its 800 twins except the S50. Similar to the system used in GSX-R sportbikes the EFI employs the Suzuki Dual Throttle Valve system (the SDTV acronym makes it sound like a home-entertainment system though) to maintain intake velocity for crisp throttle response and a 32-bit ECM for precise control of ignition timing and fuel injection. The change to EFI from the Volusia's carburetion sacrifices 0.4 gallons of fuel capacity and doubtlessly contributes to the C50's $200 additional MSRP compared to the Volusia.
However the transition from Marauder 800 to M50 involved much more than adding sophisticated induction technology. The displacement and basic design of the liquid-cooled 45-degree SOHC eight-valve 805cc V-twin engine are the same but the chassis is completely different from the Marauder's. It also replaces the Marauder's messy chain final drive with a quiet reliable low-maintenance shaft like the rest of Suzuki's 50s. The M50 is completely restyled. Its wheels and tires are the same sizes as the C50's but it gets black-painted cast wheels instead of the wire-spokes on the C50 and C50T. The bobtail-style rear fender makes it look longer and fuller. The front end is all its own with an inverted 41mm fork straddling an abbreviated fender and a brake disc that's a different style but the same size as the C50's. Atop the fork a big speedo crowns a low-rise bar on pullback risers. The warning lights nestle in a chrome

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International Motorsports

100-9420 200a Street,
Langley, BC V1M 4C2

555-555-XXXX604-288-1553Display Phone

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